Beatles News


Madame Tussauds in Hollywood will unveil a new exhibit of four Beatles’ wax figures on the anniversary of John Lennon’s death on Thursday, December 8, 2011 at 9 a.m. at the Madame Tussauds Hollywood location at 6933 Hollywood Blvd.

Fans are invited to come place flowers at the feet of a lifelike John Lennon wax figure, complete with his trademark circular glasses and shoulder-length hair, to mark the 31st anniversary of Lennon’s death. Fans who arrive on December 8, 2011 with flowers and mention “Beatles” at the door will receive free admission to the attraction from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m.

The interactive exhibit features George, John, Paul and Ringo in their late 1960’s-era styling and allows fans to stand in line with the Beatles to create their own personalized album cover.  The traveling exhibit will be in town from December 8, 2011 through February 2012.

For attraction pricing and other information, please visit  www.madametussauds.com/hollywood.

[Source: Rubenstein Public Relations]

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Ringo Starr’s 17th solo studio record, and his second on Hip-O/Ume will be released on January 31, 2012 in the United States (Internationally, January 30, 2012.)
Titled simply “Ringo 2012” and produced by Ringo, it was recorded in LA and mixed in England by Ringo and Bruce Sugar, and features 9 songs.
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Of the 9 tracks two are covers,  “Think It Over,” and “Rock Island Line” and two are new versions of his own songs, “Wings” and “Step Lightly.”
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The track listing is as follows:
1.     Anthem   (Richard Starkey/Glen Ballard)
2.     Wings      (Richard Starkey/Vince Poncia)
3.     Think It Over  (Buddy Holly/Norman Perry)
4.     Samba   (Richard Starkey/Van Dyke Parks)
5.     Rock Island Line   (Arrangement by Richard Starkey)
6.     Step Lightly   (Richard Starkey)
7.     Wonderful   (Richard Starkey/Gary Nicholson)
8.     In Liverpool  (Richard Starkey/Dave Stewart)
9.     Slow Down   (Richard Starkey/Joe Walsh)
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Joining Ringo in the studio for Ringo 2012 were musicians (in alphabetical order): Michael Bradford, Ann Marie Calhoun, Matt Cartsonis, Steve Dudas, Charlie Haden, Amy Keys,  Kelly Moneymaker, Richard Page, Van Dyke parks, Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Dave Stewart, Bruce Sugar, Benmont Tench, Joe Walsh , Don Was, Edgar Winter.
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“Ringo 2012” will be released digitally, on CD and vinyl.

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(Source: Official press release)

by Liscio

What Stuart Sutcliffe fan hasn’t wished to learn as much as possible about the fascinating young artist and Beatle?  His time with us was short yet incredibly creative; every surfacing artwork, picture, letter or anecdote is pored over with relish by admirers. But some things Sutcliffe-lovers were sadly certain they would never get to know: for instance—his voice.

That’s why the digital release of “Love Me Tender“, sung by Stuart himself, is an astonishing event generating stunned excitement and questions about the song’s origin and authenticity.

“Love Me Tender” was Stuart’s signature song; a ballad he performed so well in Hamburg it received the best applause during the Beatles’ sets at the Kaiserkeller and Star Club. Sutcliffe also performed Carl Perkins’ “Matchbox” and Elvis Presley’s “Wooden Heart”.  But “Love Me Tender” is the song most associated with his name.

His newly-released song, now available to the public for the first time in 50 years,  is compelling listening: Stu’s voice strains just slightly ending the first refrain, and he gives us a very sexy exhale at the end of another. In between, the notes are confident, strong, on pitch and melodic. Sutcliffe has made this version of Presley’s tune unabashedly his own.

In fact the track is so good, some listeners maintain they don’t even care if it is Stuart (though they hope it is) and skeptics are accusing the Sutcliffe family of overdubbing the voice of a professional singer. (One might point out that as a paid member of a hard-working rock band, Stuart was a professional singer).

Another quick discrediting attempt claimed the song originated from a 1979 American movie—that version has none of the soft nasality indicative of Liverpool accents, clearly evident in Stuart’s singing.  Noting this, listeners say Stuart sounds like John or George.  David Bedford, author of “Liddypool: Birthplace of the Beatles”—and a life-long Liverpudlian—confirms, “Yes, nasal talking is a scouse thing for sure.  As Stuart’s parents were Scottish, his accent was different to John’s and would sound different too – it differs on where in Liverpool you are from.”

So—where has such a sensational piece of musical history been hiding for the past 50 years?

Stuart’s sister Pauline says, “I never expected to receive this recording of Stuart singing ‘Love Me Tender’ because I was told the only recording which existed was locked away forever by a private collector.”

But quite unexpectedly in 2009, Stuart’s Estate became aware that a copy was available through another source. Once they’d obtained it, a substantial effort of time and money was spent trying to trace its provenance. “As far as we know for certain, Stuart’s ‘Love Me Tender’ track was recorded in Hamburg, probably 1961—after Stuart officially left the Beatles to pursue his art, ” says Pauline. “On one occasion we were told that it was a one-sided German Polydor acetate. Another source tells us that we have a copy from a reel-to-reel recording. We’ve also been advised that new instrumentation has been overdubbed.”

Though gaps in the history remain, one thing is unequivocally certain: it is Stuart. Says Pauline, “The family do know Stuart’s voice when they hear it – and this is Stuart’s voice.”

Those who are surprised that Sutcliffe could sing suffer from the same myopic misconception that had them believing he couldn’t play bass guitar. David Bedford  reminds us that as a young lad in Liverpool, Stuart was head chorister for St. Gabriel’s church in Huyton, leading the singing for Sunday services and weddings. The former choirboy still sounds youthful and earnest—some say his voice on “Love Me Tender” is “angelic”—some say “haunting”—while others are reminded of Phil and Don Everly’s sweet harmonies.

In a recent phone conversation, Pauline revealed that once the Estate possessed the recording, they were just “trying to get comfortable with it”.  One can only wonder what it was like for a sister to hold in her hands an object containing a special voice from so very long ago . A missing piece had at last come home.

In time, those responsible for overseeing Stuart’s Estate were curious to know whether the tape could be cleaned up. Help came in the form of Dan Whitelock-Wainwright, Pauline’s techno-expert great-nephew, currently at University and a member of the rock band Groan. Dan’s cousin Alex Whitelock-Wainwright (at University in Liverpool) also possessed a copy of the original tape and he wrote in his blog: “The original I have has a constant hiss throughout; that’s all that has been modified with the released version and the sound levels are higher. Talking to my cousin, who first tried to clean the track up, (he) believes that the noise frequencies have been totally cleaned out which has removed some instruments and they have been overdubbed back onto the track.”

It was the 24/7 division of IODA that finished the mastering, leaving Stuart’s voice unmanipulated, only louder. [Correction (11/3/2011): "24 Hour Service Station Distribution" and not "24/7 division of IODA" handled the cleaning up of the track. Marshall Dickson contacted us and explained: "I personally coordinated the sonic recovery, and also have strong reason to believe the original recording comes from an acetate, since the source file we possess has the sound of a needle sliding across a record after the music ends."]

There was never any doubt that the voice was Stuart’s. But the Estate has another reason to know the tape is genuine: they know Stuart.

The young bohemian led an accelerated life, traveling incredibly far in a very short time.  And his time in Hamburg was likely his most innovative.  Eduardo Paolozzi, Stuart’s art instructor at the School of Fine Arts in Germany, wrote: “He (Stuart) had so much energy and was so very inventive.”(1)  Musician and  artist Klaus Voorman said, “Every second of Stuart’s short time he was doing something.  His imagination was fantastic.”(2)  Everybody was aware of and amazed by Stu’s energy and the ease with which he was able to work in a variety of artistic areas.  It was completely in character for Stuart to have made this recording.

And the family’s got it in Stuart’s own writing that he planned to do just that.

Copyright: Stuart Sutcliffe Estate

Copyright: Stuart Sutcliffe Estate

Some of his Hamburg letters, reproduced here, reveal Sutcliffe’s interest in a new art project: his desire to make a movie with an accompanying soundtrack. The text reads:

“Yes! Tomorrow comes Paolozzi and Tuesday we go once

more to that ship-breaking yard which we visited last semester. I

will have with me a film camera I borrowed of Theo, Astrid’s

cousin. I’m very quickly trying to learn the technique as I’m

enthralled by the possibilities but it’s so expensive. He has many

films including some of Astrid from a few years ago, very sweet

as you can imagine. I’ll have to take advantage of the few days

I’ll have it; I’ll probably tire of it all the more quickly because of

the complete inaccessibility of all the equipment required.”

‘I made a film last week when I was at the ship-breaking yard

and I have really caught a feeling for filming, the desire that is.

I made another today and wish to make a long film accompanied

by a tape-recording.

“Thank you for your letter and the catalogues. I should have

written before but have been busy with various odds and ends.

We started the week very tired after working all weekend making

photos, or rather Astrid worked while I grew tired looking on. She

was working on a commission for Polydor making photos of this

singer Sheridan and made some marvelous ones in black and

white and color.”

Stuart was well acquainted with Tony Sheridan.  While performing in Hamburg between 1960 and 1963, Sheridan employed various backup bands, most of which were really “pickup bands”, or simply an amalgam of various musicians, rather than a group proper.(3)   It was Polydor’s A&R (Artists and Repertoire) man, Bert Kaempfert, who arranged in 1961 for the Beatles to back Sheridan for an LP called “My Bonnie”. The standard (and decidedly incomplete) story is that Stuart was present during this session, but did not participate. But both John Lennon and Tony Sheridan swore that there were several other Beatle tracks that were recorded during the two-day session, and that either they were not preserved OR something else happened to them.(3)

Tony Sheridan (left) and Stuart Sutcliffe
Copyright Astrid Kirchherr; Pauline Sutcliffe private collection

Another group recording for Polydor was a German band called The Bats. “They (the Bats) went through the usual Star Club routine…(they) recorded mainly for Polydor. Drummer Toni Cavanaugh came from the circle of musicians connected with Tony Sheridan (and) also played drums for Sheridan’s Beat Brothers/Star combo. The band’s crew changed…once in a while ex-Beatle Stuart Sutcliffe joined in.”(4)

Hamburg’s music scene in ’61 was open and inclusive, with musicians intermingling on stage and in the studio. Astrid was there with her camera, recording visual tracks while the bands made musical ones. Stuart was right in the midst of it. He’d been to the studio, played with the bands, knew Kaempfert, had all the right connections.  It’s not implausible to think that at some time during that year his voice was captured on “a German Polydor acetate”.

Or perhaps Stu recorded his own voice, and instruments were tracked in later. The fact is that Sutcliffe intended to make a recording. Since “Love Me Tender” was the cool bassist’s spotlight song, one he’d sung a hundred times or more and was the ballad he’d dedicated to his darling Astrid, it was the natural choice.

Those free Hamburg days were unparalleled—a pivitol time for art and music.  Timing can be so deadly crucial—why did Stuart’s Estate choose to release “Love Me Tender” now?

It wasn’t a decision made lightly. Pauline has balanced two missions for nearly 50 years: working determinedly to ensure her talented brother’s legacy, and striving to protect his image from harm.  In the documentary “The Lost Beatle” she reminisces that Stuart “used to be my elder brother. But now he’s my kid brother…I want to take care of him…to protect him.” Regarding “Love Me Tender”, she was wisely aware of those who would cry foul even if the Sutcliffes presented a recording contract with Stuart’s signature at the bottom.

But recent events: a partnership with promotional agency CMG Worldwide; the successful stage production of Backbeat, now showing in London’s West End; the launch of Stuart’s Official Fan Club (www.stuartsutcliffefanclub.com); and next year’s world tour art exhibition “Conversation With Stuart Stucliffe”, convinced the Estate there was no better time to release Stuart’s song than now.

There has been a shift in perspective regarding the Beatle who left the band because he loved art and Astrid Kirchherr. The media is now far less likely to depict Sutcliffe shoved aside in his shades to an obscure corner…the reluctant, incapable bassist. Commentaries adhering to that badly-sketched-in picture show their inaccuracy and age. With every unexpected and exciting new event, the remarkably talented Sutcliffe is now receiving the worldwide accolade he deserves.

Some things are worth waiting for—even if it takes 50 years.  “Love Me Tender” was definitely worth the wait. Thanks, Stu, for making certain we’d hear your voice.

[Editor's Note: Those in Beatles history who knew Stuart at the time this song was believed to be recorded, (i.e., Astrid Kirchherr, Klaus Voormann, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr) have not yet commented on their personal knowledge of the existence of this recording. ]

© 2011 Daytrippin’ – This article including photos/images may not be reproduced without permission from the author and Daytrippin.com. A brief excerpt may be reprinted with a link to the article and proper credit.

Update: More in-depth analysis on this recording has been done by David Bedford, author of Liddypool: Birthplace of The Beatles. You can read his article here:
http://www.stuartsutcliffefanclub.com/lovemetenderdb.html

Update (Nov. 4, 2011): The Beatles Examiner has obtained quotes from Klaus Voormann, Tony Sheridan and Bill Harry concerning their opinions on the recording.

References:

(1) John Willett 1967 “Art In The City”

(2) The Beatles In Hamburg/Bill Hillman Tracks (hillmanweb.com)

(3) Tony Sheridan Wikipedia

(4)  Discogs/The Bats (discogs.com)


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by Richard Stevens

On September 7, 2011, I was fortunate enough to attend the taping of the Buddy Holly tribute show for PBS at the Music Box in Hollywood.   I was invited by a friend of mine who was involved in the production.  September 7th would have been Buddy’s 75th birthday.  What a birthday tribute – in the morning, a star unveiled in front of Capitol Records on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and that evening, a concert nearby celebrating Holly’s life and music.

Prior to the concert, I knew a few of the artists who would perform, but I was also wondering if Paul McCartney would be there, knowing his great adoration for Buddy Holly.  Unfortunately, McCartney was not at this event.

A 7:00 p.m. reception and 8:00 show were scheduled, but there was a late start due to a few delays and audio issues.  Peter Asher and Chris Isaak co-hosted the show.  Asher produced the Listen to Me: Buddy Holly CD, and several of the artists featured on the CD, also released on the 7th, performed at the concert.

The concert began with opening remarks by Asher and Isaak, then Stevie Nicks got the music off to a rocking start with an amazing backing band and her performance of “Not Fade Away.”

Lyle Lovett was up next, doing “Well All Right” and accompanied by James Burton, followed with “Looking for Someone To Love.” Shawn Colvin performed “Learning the Game” followed by Patrick Stump (Fallout Boys) doing “Every Day” and “Oh Boy!”

The audience was treated to a video featuring Keith Richard and Chris Isaak who performed a soulful “Crying, Waiting, Hoping.”  Ringo Starr also appeared in a video, offering his tribute to Buddy Holly.  Michelle Branch followed Ringo with “Words Of Love” with Graham Nash performing as one of her backing vocalists.

Graham Nash was introduced, talked a bit, and then performed a great version of “Raining In My Heart.”  Peter Asher joined Graham for “Take Your Time.”  Next up was Boz Scaggs doing “Maybe Baby,” and “Rave On”, joined by Nash and Asher. This was the first artist that had to perform his song twice due to some problems.

Raul Malo (The Mavericks) performed a fantastic version of “Listen To Me” and then Chris Isaak was joined by Michelle Branch to play “Heartbeat.”  Gabe Sapotra and Victoria Asher (Peter Asher’s daughter from the band Cobra Starship) performed “Peggy Sue”.  Gabe invited Patrick Stubb over to sing “Think It Over.” This was the only other song that had to be performed twice.

Peter Asher told a story about a writer/performer meeting with Buddy Holly to offer him a song he wrote specifically for Buddy.  I had no idea who he was talking about, but then Paul Anka stepped out of the wings to perform the song he wrote for Holly, “Guess It Doesn’t Matter Anymore.”  This was a complete surprise and great addition to the talented musical line-up.

Seeing Paul Anka perform this song was the most impressive part of the show for me, and something I will never forget. He was also very funny talking about having to leave the stage to shoot Peter Asher’s introduction again.

Then Stevie Nicks graced the stage again, adding her unique sound to the classic “It’s So Easy.”

As the show came to a close, Peter Asher shared a poignant story of how Buddy Holly met Maria Elena Santiago, asked her to lunch, and proposed to her later that evening at dinner. It was a very sweet story.

Raul Malo dedicated the song “True Love Waits” (which Holly wrote especially for his wife) to Maria Elena, who was seated at a front-row table with Phil Everly.  It was a touching tribute to both Buddy Holly, and to the love he shared with his soul mate.

After a few closing words by Peter Asher, all of the night’s performers returned to the stage for an encore of “That’ll Be the Day.”  I think Buddy Holly was smiling…

The show was recorded for a PBS special to air in December and will hopefully be released on DVD. I would recommend not only Buddy Holly fans, but Beatles fans as well to watch this show. The Beatles were heavily influenced by Holly. In fact, “That’ll Be The Day” is the first song The Beatles ever recorded.

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Richard Stevens owns an extensive music collection and is a music consultant for several local disc jockeys. He has a vast knowledge of rock and pop music from the ’60s to today, both American and British.

Editor’s Note: The Listen to Me: Buddy Holly CD, produced by Peter Asher, features Ringo Starr singing “Think It Over”.  Another tribute CD, Rave On Buddy Holly, features Paul McCartney singing “It’s So Easy.”

A new collection of Buddy Holly’s greatest hits was released earlier this year called Buddy Holly Icon.

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On October 4, Paul McCartney will add to his catalog of classical works (Standing Stone, Liverpool Oratorio, Working Classical, Ecce Cor Meum) with his first original orchestral score for dance called Ocean’s Kingdom.

Ocean’s Kingdom is the result of a collaboration between Paul and New York City Ballet’s Master in Chief Peter Martins, who have worked together to present the world premiere of a new ballet for the company’s 2011/2012 season this September. The recording will be released by Hear Music/Telarc and is conducted by John Wilson, produced by John Fraser and performed by The London Classical Orchestra.

An hour long score featuring four stunning movements – “Ocean’s Kingdom,” “Hall of Dance,” “Imprisonment” and “Moonrise” – the ballet tells of a love story within the story of an underwater world whose people are threatened by the humans of Earth. The score is Paul’s most challenging and emotionally complex yet.

As he explains: “What was interesting was writing music that meant something expressively rather than just writing a song.  Trying to write something that expressed an emotion – so you have fear, love, anger, sadness to play with and I found that exciting and challenging.”

The artwork that accompanies the release is equally striking and inventive. Though it seems to suggest a city skyline, it is actually a digital readout of the notes from the ballet score.

The premiere of the ballet Ocean’s Kingdom will take place at NYCB’s Fall Gala on Thursday 22nd September 2011 while the release of the orchestral score will follow on October 4th, available digitally, on CD and on vinyl.  It was recorded in June in London.

A live recording of the world premiere gala performance by the New York City Ballet Orchestra will also be available as a bonus download.

–Information excerpted from press release

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